My 2-days trip into the Himalayas

I just got back from a journey into the higher Himalayas with its amazing nature, transforming spiritual powerspots and alchemising energies. Short notice, I had booked a car plus driver, and departed – with the blessing from Ganga Ma in Rishikesh.

I headed towards the Chaukhamba range (8000+ m) with Kedarnath mountain (3500 m) with a legendary temple dedicate to Shiva, and Gaurikund (2000 m), a location linked to goddess Parvati (Shiva’s wife).

Needless to say that the Himalayas of Northern India are always worth a visit. Also outside the pilgrimage season when the temples of the Char Dham Yatra are closed (four abodes of Yamunotri, Gangotri, Kedarnath, Badrinath).

Mandakini river (a tributary of Ganga), a marvelous puppy and me:

Augustmuni is a town 16 km (10 miles) from the city of Rudraprayag, and is named after the sage, siddah, ascetic and yogi Agastya, who is one of the original and most revered seven Rishis (Saptarishis). Many stories surround his life. Although originally from South India, he practiced and lived in the North for years. This is the idyllic and peaceful ashram in memory of Rishi Agastya, which includes several temples. I loved the atmosphere.

Kalimath is a temple of goddess Kali and regarded as shakti peeth (significant shrines and pilgrimage destinations). This place, located at 1800 m / 6000 feet above sea level on the Saraswati river, is surrounded by the peaks of Kedarnath. No idol is worshipped in the temple. Instead the Sri Yantra is the object of devotion.

A big bridge with railings full of bells leads to the temple. I crossed the bridge ringing those bells which attracted the attention of the priests. When I reached the entrance, they all stood there to check who was arriving. They smiled and welcomed me. Jai Ma!

No words to describe the sight and sense of expansion. Grateful for having a decent camera with me. Here a part of the Chaukhamba mountain range. We’re talking 8000+ meters height.

Or do you prefer blue sky as background for snowy peaks? No problem, I got that too.

I took a dip at the natural (super)hot spring at Gaurikund on the banks of Mandakini, the base camp and trekking starting point for Kedarnath temple higher up. Apparently this is the location where goddess Parvati was bathing when her son Ganesha was guarding the door and denied his father Shiva entry…

Triyugi Narayan Mandir near Kedarnath (district Rudraprayag in Uttarakhand). A beautiful temple dedicated to Vishnu. Legends tell us that Triyuginarayan was the venue of the celestial marriage of Shiva and Parvati, during the Satya Yuga, witnessed in the presence of the holy fire that still burns today (!). The name “Akhand Dhuni temple” also originates from the eternal flame legend, “Akhand” means perpetual and “Dhuni” means flame. Vishnu formalised the wedding and acted as Parvati’s brother in the ceremonies, while the creator-god Brahma acted as the priest of the wedding, that was witnessed by all the sages of the times. The exact location of the wedding is marked by a stone called Brahma Shila, in front of the temple.

Curious about living higher up in the Himalayas? It is beautiful. And for sure also quite challenging. Surprise: banana palms and orange trees at an elevation of 1400+ metres!

It all looks amazing and somewhat romantic, but believe me, the journey is quite arduous at times. And many landslides that happened during the monsoon were still blocking the roads, which can be very tight and close to the edge of a steep cliff. Look at the first picture. In the left lane, it is a huge rock, not a car…

Now I am back, and my trip of less than 3 days actually feels like eternity. I was in an entirely different dimension. An eternal high frequency field. Clearing and activating on various levels. And spiritually nourishing in a way which can not be described in words.

All photos: own archive 2021, © copyright Marina
No extracting, copying, quoting or printing allowed without my written permission.

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